The Eloran and the Larhim

A creation story shared by certain less popular religions across the ages, who some would say are misunderstood and wrongfully persecuted.

Pythagoreans worship the sun



In the beginning, there were two kinds of gods: the Eloran and the Larhim. The Eloran were big, powerful, lumbering gods. The Larhim were small gods, good at small things. To keep from getting trampled, they learned to pay attention, to be clever and quick, to make themselves useful.

When the gods found the world, it was flat and blank and dark. It was the first world anyone had ever seen; all the gods gathered to gaze in wonder. But old gods get bored more quickly than you might think. To amuse themselves, the Eloran made the first people, and laid them on the ground. The people lay there, where they were put.

The Eloran asked, “Why don’t they do something?”

The Larhim said, “It is dark. The mortals cannot see. You could make a light.” So the Eloran created the sun, which blazed down bright and hot. The people covered their eyes and shied away. The Larhim moved the sun farther away, and made it rise and set so there would be night. The people sat up and looked around, then they lay back down.

The Eloran asked, “Why don’t they do something?”

The Larhim said, “They can see, but there is nothing for them to look at.” The Eloran formed the earth into mountains and valleys and cliffs, but they were gray and featureless. The Larhim invented color, and painted the world with greens and browns and blues and yellows. They covered the land with soft sands and whispering grasses and swaying trees, and dotted it with vivid flowers. They created rain, and rivers and lakes and seas to hold it, and snow and ice for it to hide under. The people sat up and looked around. Then night came, and they lay back down.

The Eloran asked, “Why don’t they do something?”

The Larhim said, “Look how they cover their eyes. They are afraid of the dark.” The Larhim made the moon, with all its different faces, to keep the people company at night. They forged thousands of stars, each carefully placed in its own pattern: puzzles for the people to decipher when they were older. The people took their hands from their eyes and contemplated the night sky.

The Eloran asked, “Why don’t they do something?”

The Larhim said, “Look how they are huddled together. They are cold.” The Eloran wanted to bring the sun closer again, but the Larhim said, “No, let us put a little part of the sun on the world with them. That will keep them warm enough.” And the Larhim gave the people fire. The people moved closer to the fire, and sat there.

The Eloran asked,”Why don’t they do something?”

The Larhim said, “They have nothing that challenges them. Make them something to eat, and they will get up to get it.” The Eloran put fruits on the bushes and nuts on the trees and vegetables in the ground, but the people did not understand. Then the Larhim made animals and birds, from the smallest fly to the largest elephant. The people saw the animals and birds eating the fruits and nuts and vegetables, and they understood food. So the people got up to gather the food, and ate it. This entertained the Eloran. There were so many different types of foods and various ways of finding and eating them. Plus, it was hard to tell which ones were poisonous, which made the game even more fun to watch. Then the Eloran noticed the animals and birds hunting and eating one another, which upset them. Were the Larhim’s creatures more capable than their people? More interesting?

The Eloran asked, “Why don’t the people eat the animals and birds?”

The Larhim said, “You did not give them claws or fangs. How can they hunt?” The Eloran wanted to give the people claws and fangs, but the Larhim said, “No, then they would not be people anymore.” The Larhim made spears and bows and snares and laid them on the ground, but the people did not understand. Then the Larhim sent their servants to demonstrate how to hunt and trap, and how to use the fire to cook meat. The people hunted and trapped the animals and birds, and cooked them over the fire, and ate them. This was even better than watching them gather food, for a time.

The Eloran asked, “Why don’t they do something else?”

The Larhim asked, “What else do you want them to do?” The Eloran shrugged and started to wander off. So the Larhim gave the people language, then humor, then music. The people talked with each other, and laughed, and sang songs, and danced around the fire. The Larhim taught the people arts and crafts. The people painted striking designs on the rocks, and designed beautiful clothes and rugs and pots, and made colorful decorations for their bodies.

As the Larhim watched the people, they experienced new emotions: love, happiness, pride. So they gave these emotions to the people as well. The people celebrated with joyous festivals. They had sex, got married, formed families. But knowing love and happiness and pride, the people soon learned the lack of these as well. They suffered anger, jealousy, hatred, greed. They divided into groups of us versus them. They went to war, and killed each other, and cheered viciously. They spread all across the land, to be farther from their enemies. They developed new tools, to be better than their enemies. They developed new weapons, to defeat their enemies. No longer did the people lay on the ground, still and quiet.

The Eloran said, “We are pleased.” They reached out to touch the people, to make themselves known. They said, “We made you. Worship us.” The people were awestruck at being touched by the gods, and their hearts filled with wonder and gratitude. So from that day forward, the people worshiped the Eloran. They called them creators. They called them protectors. They called them good.

Then the Larhim reached out to touch the people. The people saw that they were deceivers, trying to lure them away from the true gods. So from that day forward, the people reviled the Larhim. They called them tricksters. They called them false. They called them evil.

Though the gods have different names now, and different faces, still they are the Eloran and the Larhim. The Eloran made us, and so you worship them. The Larhim made us who we are, and so we worship them.

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One thought on “The Eloran and the Larhim

  1. Pingback: About the Blog | Tales from Eneana

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